Corgane: Corgi and Great Dane Mix A Complete Guide

Corgi and Great Dane Mix

Not many people would think to cross one of the biggest dog breeds in the world with some of the smallest but most would be surprised about how compatible the two are when combined into a single dog!

Corganes are the result of a Welsh Corgi and a Great Dane crossing. Although they come from vastly different walks of life, the family-friendly and playful nature of both parent breeds shines through the mixed offspring.


Keep reading to learn more about the Corgane, its parent breeds, and whether this designer dog is a good fit for your living situation!

Corgi, Corgane, and Great Dane Comparison Table

Pembroke Welsh CorgiCorganeGreat Dane
Height10-12 inches12-28 inches28-32 inches
WeightUp to 30 pounds22-100 pounds110-175 pounds
Life Expectancy12-13 years7-14 years7-10 years
ColorsFawn
Red
Sable
Black and tan
Black
Blue
Brindle
Fawn
Red
Sable
Black
Blue
Brindle
Chocolate
Fawn
Harlequin
Merle
Silver
White
Mantle
Merlequin
Coat TypeDouble coat with short lengthSmooth with short lengthSmooth with short length
Affection LevelsVery lovingVery lovingVery loving
Shedding LevelHigh sheddingAverage sheddingAverage shedding
TemperamentPretty playful
Very protective
Pretty playful
Very protective
Pretty playful
Very protective
Health IssuesEye problems
Hip dysplasia
Elbow dysplasia
Cardiac problems
Degenerative myelopathy
von Willebrand’s disease
Bloat
Hip dysplasia
Eye problems
Cardiac problems
Degenerative myelopathy
von Willebrand’s disease
Hypothyroidism
Bloat
Hip dysplasia
Cardiac problems
Eye problems
Hypothyroidism
Autoimmune thyroiditis
TrainabilityPretty easy to trainPretty easy to trainAverage trainability
ExercisePretty high exercise needsPretty high exercise needsPretty high exercise needs
Friendliness to PeoplePretty good with strangersPretty good with strangersAlright with strangers
Friendliness to DogsPretty good with other dogsPretty good with other dogsAlright with other dogs
Drooling LevelsLittle to no droolingLess droolingMore drooling
Mental StimulationHigh mental stimulation requiredHigh mental stimulation requiredHigh mental stimulation required
Barking LevelMore barkingAverage barkingAverage barking
Corgi, Corgane, and Great Dane Comparison Table

About Pembroke Welsh Corgis

Possibly one of the most recognizable small dog breeds to exist, Corgis are well-known for their creamy white and tan coats as well as their erect ears.

Docked tails – a practice often thought to be inhumane in today’s age – are also a part of the Corgi’s signature look (at least for the Pembroke variety). However, the stubby tails are more than just for show.

As short herding dogs, a longer tail could get trampled by livestock. It also helped Corgi squeeze into smaller spaces without getting snagged on something if they needed to chase vermin in and around the farm.

Corgi Dog Breed
Corgi Dog Breed

Welsh Corgis, especially the Pembroke breed, stole the heart of the late Queen Elizabeth II, securing the breed’s future for years to come.

As if that wasn’t enough, these little fuzzballs have taken the world by storm through goofy and adorable adventures documented on countless social media accounts.

About Great Danes

Sometimes referred to as the “Apollo of Dogs”, the grandiose name betrays a sense of pompousness and a dog that is too big for its equally big britches when the opposite is quite true.

Although majestic and imposing in appearance, the breed is renowned for being people pleasers and exceedingly gentle with children.

Similar to how the Great Dane is more humble than its name suggests, the name itself is a misleading misnomer. No one is quite sure how the dog became associated with the Danish people of Denmark because the breed is thoroughly documented as a German creation.

Great Dane Dog Breed
Great Dane Dog Breed

Perhaps it is because of the variety of names it has had in other European cultures like “grand Danois” in France (meaning big Danish).

Nevertheless, these gentle giants were bred for the express purpose of hunting down wild boar. Now, their courageous escapades lay behind them for the most part but the breed is still happy to act as an alert guardian of the homestead.

About Corganes

Corganes are an unusual combination when you think in terms of the parent breeds’ sizes. When you look at their personality traits, however, you’ll find a great deal of overlap that makes for a very affable dog.

What Will My Corgane Look Like?

As with all hybrid dog breeds, accurately predicting the appearance of any dog at maturity just by looking at a litter of puppies or genetics is difficult.

That’s why the table above has such a wide range of heights and weights because it is possible to have some puppies that take after one parent more than the other, accentuating the physical differences between the two.

That being said, most Corganes are typically considered small to medium-sized dogs. Typically, they have a little bit more of a Great Dane’s face and snout, along with the possibility of droopy ears.

The coat of a Corgane is also usually inherited from the Great Dane parent, meaning it will be smooth and short. The lack of a double coat makes the mixed breed less fluffy in appearance and more susceptible to cold temperatures.

Are Corganes Healthy Dogs?

You might feel overwhelmed by the long list of potential health concerns from the table above and rightfully so. Unfortunately, both parent breeds can pass along a wide range of genes with a higher risk for any of these conditions which might limit a Corgane’s lifespan and quality of life.

You need to be prepared to spend money to treat or alleviate symptoms if you plan to purchase or adopt a Corgane.

However, if proper screening of stock is performed, there is no reason why a Corgane can’t live a happy life with few or none of these impairments. Some can even be avoided simply by following a proper diet and exercise routine.

If all goes well, your Corgane can have an extended lifespan longer than that of most individuals from either parent breed.

Are Corganes Hypoallergenic Dogs?

No, neither parent is considered hypoallergenic so the Corgane is not either. While the Corgane is a moderately low shedder and is unlikely to be leaving pools of drool everywhere, there is still a great potential for all types of allergens to be introduced to your home environment.

If you are set on getting a Corgane but have relatively mild allergies, you can attempt to stay ahead of allergic reactions by regularly brushing your Corgane to concentrate allergens in one spot and then washing your hands and arms thoroughly afterward. An air filter can also be used to help keep dander particles out of the air. Wiping down and cleaning hard surfaces will also reduce exposure to allergens in dog saliva.

Conclusion

Corganes are an unusual amalgamation of two different breeds born of in vitro fertilization and carried by a surrogate but are lovely family dogs to have around for their playfulness and ease of training.

Early socialization and training will help keep most undesirable behaviors away – even first-time dog owners can do well thanks to the Corgane’s desire to please.

Be sure to consider how much space you have for a Corgane, especially if you get a puppy since you may not know the mature size of your dog until a few months down the road or longer. The Corgane can adapt to a smaller space but will thrive with more where possible.